Travellers to Bagan will not have to worry about not having any interesting places to visit. In fact, the only problem they may encounter is deciding on which destination to go to first. As the capital of the first Myanmar Empire, Bagan is home to many archaeological sites. There are many temples, pagodas and monuments to be found throughout the area and visitors can embark on a spiritual and historical journey by going from one temple to another as all the buildings are beautifully and uniquely designed.

However, there is more to Bagan than temples and religious monuments. Bagan is also home to Myanmar’s archaeological museum, as well as the highly revered Mount Popa.

Ananda Temple

This temple is one of the few remaining examples of Mon architecture; it was damaged during a 1975 earthquake but has been successfully restored. The Ananda Temple is recognized as the best preserved and most revered of Bagan temples.

Bagan Archaeological Museum

This Bagan attraction was officially opened in 1998. Tourists who want to explore the history of Old Bagan can visit the museum to see objects used during the Bagan period. The first floor houses the showrooms for visual arts and coiffures of court ladies, while the second floor has display rooms with religious themes.

Opening Hours: 09:30-15:00 daily except Mondays and public holidays. 
Location: Northern part of Bagan, in the Old Bagan region.

Bu Pagoda (Bu Paya)

The name of this Bagan attraction already gives a perfect description of the place: Bu Paya means ‘a gourd-shaped pagoda.’ According to legend, Pyusawhti rid the area of ‘bu,’ which was a gourd-like climbing plant that infested the riverbanks. As a reward, he became the heir to the throne of Bagan and its third king.

Dhammayangyi Temple

The Dhammayangyi Temple is one of the four major Bagan monuments and ranks alongside Shwezigon Pagoda, Ananda Temple and Thatbyinnyu Temple in importance. Its grandiose architectural plan is similar to Ananda Temple and was built by King Narathu, also known as Kalagya Min, ‘the king killed by Indians.’

Gawdawpalin Temple

The Gawdawpalin Temple is one of the biggest shrines in Bagan, and the most imposing because of the Buddha images to be found on the ground floor.

The building of the two-storey temple was commenced by King Narapatisithu but it was his son who completed the construction. The name of the temple means ‘the throne which has worshipped.’

Htilominlo Temple

Like the Shwezigon Pagoda, the Htilominlo Temple can be found in the Nyaung U and Wetkyi-In region of Bagan. The 46-metre, three-storey temple was built in 1218, during the reign of King Nantaungmya.

It is said that the name is a misreading of the Pali term for ‘Blessings of the Three Worlds.’

Mount Popa

A visit to Bagan would not be complete without a trip to Mount Popa. Considered as one of the most popular pilgrimage spots in Myanmar, Mount Popa is an extinct volcano where the Popa Taungkalat Monastery is found. Popa used to be called the ‘Mountain of Spirits,’ and is still recognized as a dwelling of ‘nats,’ or spirits of ancient ancestors.

Location: 50 kilometres from Bagan, Popa region, Kyaukpadaung Township. 

Shwezigon Pagoda

The Shwezigon Pagoda is considered as Bagan’s most significant shrine. It is said that the structure was built to enshrine one of the four replicas of the Buddha’s tooth in Kandy, Sri Lanka.

The construction was started by King Anawrahta, but the project was not completed until the rule of King Kyanzittha.

Location: Northwest of Kyanzittha Umin near the banks of Irrawaddy River, in the regions of Nyaung U and Wetkyi-In.