Buddha Amulets Phuket Town

In a tiny alley off Rassada Road in Phuket Town, not far from the Fountain Circle and just a few steps from Salvatore’s Italian restaurant, is the Phuket Buddha image and amulet market, a specialised market that attracts many local and overseas Buddhists.

Bang Neow Shrine

The Bang Neow Shrine (also spelled Bang Niew), known also as Tao Buang Keng and Thep Rasi Foundation Shrine, is another beautiful place of worship in Phuket Town. Founded in 1904, it was originally part of another shrine at Soi Romanee in the Old Town. It has moved a few times – strangely enough always because of fire.

If looking in from the road, you’ll notice that the shrine is unusually long and has many doors. This is because it houses many shrines (almost 10 of them) that lie immediately next to each other. The most important shrine is the one in the middle, where the main deity is.

Baan Chinpracha in Phuket Town

Baan Chinpracha, at 98 Krabi Road in Phuket, is a fine example of a Sino-Colonial mansion and is just a few doors away from the famous Blue Elephant Restaurant. Visitors not only will have a sneak peek of how a wealthy Phuket family used to live many decades ago but they can meet its owner too.

Jaroonrat ‘Daeng’ Tandavanitj and her late husband, Pracha Tandavanitj, inherited this elegant building from his father, who in turn was the eldest son of the original owner, Phra Pitak Chinpracha, who built it in 1903.

Hok Nguan Kung Shrine in Phuket

ok Nguan Kung Shrine at the Surin Clock Circle, near the Metropole Hotel has long been a religious centre of many Phuket families since it was founded more than 80 years ago.

The most important ritual object here is the crafted image of Ju Su Kong (hence locals refer to this shrine as Ju Su Kong Shrine.). His statue is made from sandalwood and is black from head to toe, so it’s not difficult to recognize him

Jao Mae Kuan Im

Jao Mae Kuan Im is a small vintage shrine on Bangkok Road in the heart of Phuket Town, just a few steps from the ‘Fountain Circle’ and the main fresh market.

The shrine celebrated its 120th anniversary in 2011 and, as its name suggests, devoted to Kuan Im, the Goddess of Mercy in Taoist mythology (also known as Guanyin and Kannon). Her image is also seen on altars in Chinese shrines, households and work situations.